Agenda

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Séminaires CBI de la semaine du 23-05-2022 au 29-05-2022

Lundi 23 Mai

CODE/RNA/SYSMIC Project leader Working Day
Autre séminaire
Titre : CODE/RNA/SYSMIC Project leader Working Day
09:00

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CODE séminaire public
Titre : CODE - Chromatin Seminar series CBI
11:00
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)

Mardi 24 Mai

CODE/RNA/SYSMIC Project leader Working Day
Autre séminaire
Titre : CODE/RNA/SYSMIC Project leader Working Day
09:00

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Justine Creff
STADE séminaire public
Titre : Mechanics of cell heterogeneity in the gut
11:00
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)
Laure Verret (CRCA-CBI)
NEUROBIOLOGY séminaire interne
Titre : Memory deficits and functional recovery in Alzheimer’s mouse model : the inhibitory neurons as the headline
12:15
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)

Alzheimer’s disease has been first described more than a century ago, but the neuronal mechanisms underlying its associated memory deficits are still not totally understood. During this seminar, I will explain how we identified - a decade ago ! - that a subtype of inhibitory neurons is a key actor in memory deficits in AD mouse models. Moreover, as these neurons are particularly prone to undertake changes in response to experience, I will show data suggesting that they might be a good target for environmental and/or pharmacological interventions to recover memory capacities in the context of AD. 

SYSMIC séminaire interne
Titre : SysMic Seminars
16:00
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)

Mercredi 25 Mai

Brian Smith (Arizona State University)
BEHAVIOR séminaire public
Titre : Individual Differences in Learning Performance: From Genes, to Behavior, to Ecology
12:15
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)

Animal ‘personalities’ arise from individual differences in predispositions to show adaptive behaviors under natural conditions. In particular, these differences are important for shaping how animals interact in social networks that are important for their, and other animals’, survival. Honey bees are a case in point. Honey bee colonies are composed of a queen and up to 100,000 workers, and, since workers are sterile, their evolutionary fitness depends on closely coordinating their activities to support the queen. Every worker specializes on different tasks (e.g. nursing, guarding, foraging) as they age. Furthermore, foragers from the same colony, i.e. from the same queen, show differences in learning performance on several standard nonassociative and associative conditioning protocols. We have found that a substantial basis for these individual differences lies in genotype, which arise because every queen mates with up to 20 drones (males). Thus, workers from the same colony represent the genetic diversity from a large number of possible fathers. Our selection has focused around selection for genetic lines of workers that show high or low levels of Latent Inhibition (LI). We have used Quantitative Train Locus mapping to identify regions of the honey bee genome that correlate to learning performance on LI. A detailed analysis of one locus has identified a biogenic amine receptor correlated to high and low LI. Pharmacological blockade and RNAi-based disruption of this receptor has clear (albeit counterintuitive) effects on the trait as well as on neural correlates of the behavior in the brain. The receptor is located on presynaptic terminals in two brain areas, where it has potentially inhibitory effects via depression of cAMP levels. More recently we have evaluated what the presence of these forager learning genotypes does for a colony. High-LI foragers focus on known food resources, whereas Low-LI foragers tend to be the ones locating new resources. Thus, it appears that the genotypic variation is useful for a colony as it may represent a trade-off between exploration and exploitation for food and other resources. Finally, we are currently investigating how the optimal genotypic composition of a colony may depend on the distribution of food resources, and whether epigenetic factors regulate the impact of a genotype on a foragers learning performance.

Zacchari Ben Meriem - LAAS
Curiosity Seminar
Titre : Towards complete mechano-chemical control in Tumor-on-a-Chip
14:00
4R4-RDC | Salle Conférence (Hors-COVID = 182 pers., COVID = 91 pers.)

The increasing need for new in vitro technologies to mimick functional pathologies and organs has led to the developpement of new micro-physiological devices. One of these pathology is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer (PDAC), a particularly aggressive cancer, with a death toll of 99% after 5 years. As of today, there is no efficient treatment or targeted therapy. The rapid proliferation of the cancerous cells in a confined environment, along with the remodeling of the extracellular matrix, leads to growth-induced mechanical compressive stresses that eventually accumulate in PDAC. Although mechanical stresses alter cellular physiology and cancer treatments, we further hypothesize that cancer cells could modulate their response to chemical signals in presence of mechanical stresses. In this context, it is not known if specific mechanical stresses can either promote or restrain tumor progression.


To address these questions, we are developing one of the first experimental platform based on microfluidics that permits the study of cancer cells in a perfectly controlled environment. More specifically, we can include a population of cells (whether separated or agregated) in a extracellular matrix (ECM) of our chosing and confine the total in our device. We can then subjugate this ensemble to a single or a gradient of mechanical compressions on several locations, therefore altering the intensity of the ECM and compressing the cells. Our microfluidic platform also enables a dynamical control of the chemical environment. This allows us to perform operations such as chemical gradients or the coupling between mechanical and biochemical signals. Moreover, innovative microfabrication approaches even allow us to recover the sample of interest (such as patient-derived organoid) to perform subsequent analysis. We are currently using this experimental platform to determine how a cellular biological response is altered following a mechanical environments.


Altogether, our work can bridge the biochemical, genetic and mechanical characteristics of cancer cells. Our device can eventually be used to understand cancer progression and explore novel therapeutic strategies incorporating mechanics.

Jeudi 26 Mai

Vendredi 27 Mai

Samedi 28 Mai

Dimanche 29 Mai

Université Paul Sabatier
118 Route de Narbonne

31062 TOULOUSE Cedex
France

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