Regulation and transport of proteins across cell membranes

Raffaele Ieva


CR CNRS
05 61 33 59 11

Team members

  LMGM
  • Anne Sarcos
  • Violette Morales
  Researcher
  • Raffaele Ieva
  PhD student
  • Yassin Abu Ta'a
  • Haoxiang Chen
  • Maurine Marteau
  Master student
  • Lucie Esmangart

Research programs

Presentation

Our team studies how cells build their membranes, assembling and regulating a large number of molecular machines.

The membranes of a cell define the borders of its compartments and separate its interior from the external environment. Cell membranes also house molecular machines made of secretory proteins. These devices fulfill a vast variety of functions such as transport of nutrients, metabolites, proteins and nucleic acids, as well as energy conversion and signaling.

In our lab, we study:

1) How secretory proteins are correctly recognized and transported across or assembled into membranes;

2) How the cell ensures the coherent development of its compartments coordinating multiple biogenesis events in space and time;

3) How membrane biogenesis processes are regulated in response to signaling cues and environmental stresses.   

To address these questions, we use two evolutionary related model systems focusing on the biogenesis of membranes surrounding Gram-negative bacteria and on the biogenesis of membranes surrounding mitochondria. Our ultimate objective is to decipher novel molecular pathways that can be exploited for the development of new therapeutics, for instance compounds to fight antimicrobial resistance (AMR) or modulators of mitochondrial functions.

 

 

Publications

View all publications

Funding

         

Université Paul Sabatier
118 Route de Narbonne

31062 TOULOUSE Cedex
France


05 61 33 58 00

Annuaire général